S C H E D U L E

09.05.2019 - RECITAL

Renmin University School of Music Concert Hall

10.05.2019 - SEMINAR

Capital Normal University Conservatory of Music

10.05.2019 - WORKSHOP

Capital Normal University Conservatory of Music

13.05.2019 - RECITAL

South China Normal University Concert Hall

    THANK YOU FOR COMING!    

     ALL EVENTS HAVE ENDED     

14.05.2019 - SEMINAR

South China Normal University

14.05.2019 - WORKSHOP

South China Normal University Concert Hall

15.05.2019 - MASTERCLASS

South China University of Technology

15.05.2019 - DISSCUSSION

South China University of Technology

15.05.2019 - RECITAL

South China University of Technology Concert Hall

M U S I C.  R E C I T A L

M U S I C.  W O R K S H O P

TANG XU

JI (2018)

JOHN PSATHAS

Jettatura (1999)

JOHN PSATHAS

Gyftiko (2010)

ZHANG FEI

Field Scenery (2016)

GAO PING

Questioning the Mountains (2008)

- Interval -

TORU TAKEMITSU

Distance de Fee (1951)

TORU TAKEMITSU

Hika (1966)

TORU TAKEMITSU

From far beyond Chrysanthemums and november Fog (1983)

CHEN YAO

Inquietude (World  Premiere, 2019)

PENG-PENG LIU

Reflections in A Sleet-Ceased Night (2019)


LI HAO YUE

浮、沉 (2019)


CHENG XIAO

钢琴小提琴二重奏 (2019)


HE PING

春 (2019)


YU SHIXIAO

Lonely Planet (2019)


YU QUIYU

“走神儿”的音符 (2019)


YU ZIYUE

Melody for a Rainy Bridge (2019)


ZHOU YUHAN

前奏曲 (2019)


WANG ZHE

小提琴与钢琴 (2019)

YIJI FENG

Breath of Flames (2019)

 

ZHUZHOU PENG

the weight of lightness (2019)

PROGAMME NOTES

TANG XU

JI (2018)

JI was commissioned by New Zealand/Japanese duo Isomura Brothers. The work was written in December, 2017. The energy of nature is enormous, irresistible, unpredictable. Humankind is insignificant in the face of nature’s unexpected force. When unknown forces come, we feel fear, panic, helplessness. But the powerful vitality of nature can manifest in creative ways as well, so love and hope take root and burgeon in this force.


JI 极, means literally pole, utmost point, extreme. All things in the world have two sides, or two polarities, such as bright and dark, loose and tight, fast and slow, high and low, positive and negative and so on, forming a very strongly contrasted energy. (TANG, Xu)

JOHN PSATHAS

Jettatura (1999)

A great test for advanced pianists, Jettatura (1999) is an uncomplicated moto perpetuo, and another example of Psathas’s gift for creating high-energy, compelling works. Requiring heavy and impassioned fingering, Jettatura is shot through with defiance and aggression. The left hand hammers a stream of ostinatos while the right hand flies almost incautiously over the keys, stretching to the piano’s upper register. A Jettatura is the ancient belief that the gaze of strangers casts unwanted magic into the lives of the innocent . The belief is that a person — otherwise not malefic in any way — can harm you, your children, your livestock, merely by looking at them with envy and praising them. (PSATHAS, John)

Gyftiko (2010)

Gyftiko is Psathas’ first work for solo violin. It was written as a virtuoso test piece for the 2011 Michael Hill International Violin Competition, receiving its premiere by the competitors in Queenstown, New Zealand. The piece, which is comprised of quick melismatic passages, intertwining voices, and a heavy use of double-stops, is both expressive and virtuosic. The title of the work translates to ‘gypsy- like’; a moniker which relates to and informs the modal flavour throughout the piece. Gyftiko is unrelenting with regards to the level of technical competency required by the performer, and though all notes have been distinctly specified, sections of the work exhibit an improvisatory quality. (PSATHAS, John)

ZHANG FEI

Field Scenery (2016)

The piano composition of Field Scenery consists of four separate pieces: water town, distant mountains, spring rain, and bees. It depicts the imaginary scenery in the composer’s dreams. Through these four pieces, he hopes to express a nostalgic longing for home. (ZHANG, Fei)

GAO PING

Questioning the Mountains (2008)

“Questioning the Mountain” was commissioned by the Japanese violinist Rieko Suzuki with whom I have enjoyed a duo partnership for several years. The work was written in June, 2008, immediately after the devastating earthquake in my home region of Sichuan.

The piece is a meditation on the tragic event and a nostalgic offering to my motherland, Sichuan. Its slow and procession-like unfolding suggests some kind of ritual; one that is at once somber and graceful.

 

A fragment from the Sichuan folksong “On the High Mountains” becomes a recurring motive, like an unanswered question, which at the end transforms into a repeating bass line that gives the foundation to a flourishing melisma in the high register of the piano. (GAO, Ping)

TORU TAKEMITSU

From far beyond Chrysanthemums and november Fog (1983)

From far beyond Chrysanthemums and November fog was composed in 1983 as a test piece for the violin division in the second International Competition of Japan. The title was taken from a stanza of the poem entitled Kage no nakade (In the Shadows) by Makoto Ooka. The work closely intertwined with the original poem in its atmospheric quality and imaginary ideas. The title itself also beautifully matches the overall character presented in this work; with the Chrysanthemums, the celebrated imperial flower of Japan representing the ever so enhanced oriental essence of the work, and the fog being represented through the enigmatic atmosphere delivered by the faint sound qualities and sul tasto phrases. In every brevity of a musical phrase, Takemitsu has fruited this masterpiece with multiple musical elements gained throughout his career.

Hika (1966)

The Hika was composed in the 1960's after Takemitsu's influential contact with composer John Cage, leading him to deliver his concept of 'Ma'. The aesthetic concept of Ma originates deep within traditional Japanese culture and is a unique element felt throughout the country and its people. It is through this concept, Takemitsu achieved to deliver musical intensity throughout his works. Many elements presented in this work essentially blur the sense of tonal and rhythmic expectancy of the listener, most notably in its extensive 'single bar' violin cadenza.

Distance de Fee (1951)

Distance de Fee, or Yousei no Kyori in Japanese, was one of his earliest works to have received a public performance. Composed during Takemitsu's life as a member of the Jikken Kobo (Experimental Factory) and was inspired by a surrealism poem by Shuzo Takiguchi. The work incorporates multiple French expressions yet the work does not sound exactly French but rather a desire to sound French. This is perhaps largely due to the unconscious embodiment of traditional Japanese qualities within the work.

 

Takemitsu, at the time avoided the music of his own tradition as it triggered bitter memories of war time, and this early work clearly resembles his struggle to avoid being 'Japanese'. The work delivers harmonic influences from western composers such as Debussy and Messiaen while also delivering qualities of traditional Japanese music, creating a unique sound
world with qualities of both western a and Japanese culture.

CHEN YAO

Inquietude (2019)

For me, music is supreme in its power to make the experiences of life into memorable, transfixing, eternal events. A composer has the means to instill the specific meaning of a precise moment into his/her music, but at times, details of life may seep their way into the act of composition quietly, even subconsciously. Within any piece of music, these two paths intersect and develop simultaneously.
 

Even if I am unsure which path was first in this case, 'Inquietude' for violin and piano is a commemoration of a rather poignant time in my life,a time of love, freedom, as well as growth. The word 'inquietude' itself is deeply ingrained in the musical fabrics of the piece, defined through its irregular rhythmic movements, frictions of dissonant narrow intervals and drastic exchanges between different textures, tempi and melodic modes.

 

Through these intertwined materials, and despite its short duration, the work manages to create a dramatic persona who both refuses to dwell in the present and suffers inquietude from an unknown future. In this piece, two instruments represent two different times: piano the present and violin the unknown future. In-between resides a soul in inquietude.

(CHEN, Yao)

This non-profit tour is made possible with support from the Capital Normal University Conservatory of Music, South China Normal University School of Music, South China University of Technology School of Arts and the Renmin University School of Music.

2014 - 2019 © Isomura Brothers & Mazzoli Trio

KATIA KALYANI

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